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When should you call your doctor about heart failure?

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If you have any unusual symptoms, don't wait until your next appointment to discuss it with your doctor. Call him right away if you have:

  • Unexplained weight gain -- 2 pounds in a day or 5 pounds in a week
  • Swelling in your ankles, feet, legs, or belly that gets worse
  • Shortness of breath that gets worse or happens more often, especially if you wake up feeling that way
  • Bloating with a loss of appetite or nausea
  • Extreme fatigue or more trouble finishing your daily activities
  • A lung infection or a cough that gets worse
  • Fast heart rate (above 100 beats per minute, or a rate noted by your doctor)
  • New irregular heartbeat
  • Chest pain or discomfort during activity that gets better if you rest
  • Trouble breathing during regular activities or at rest
  • Changes in how you sleep,like having a hard time sleeping or feeling the need to sleep a lot more than usual
  • Less of a need to pee
  • Restlessness and confusion
  • Constant dizziness or light-headedness
  • Nausea or poor appetite

SOURCES:

Heart Failure Society of America: "Learn More About Heart Failure."

American Heart Association: "Heart Failure."

National Institutes of Health: "How Is Heart Failure Treated?"

International Journal of clinical Practice : “Ivabradine -- the first selective sinus node If channel inhibitor in the treatment of stable angina.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on September 6, 2019

SOURCES:

Heart Failure Society of America: "Learn More About Heart Failure."

American Heart Association: "Heart Failure."

National Institutes of Health: "How Is Heart Failure Treated?"

International Journal of clinical Practice : “Ivabradine -- the first selective sinus node If channel inhibitor in the treatment of stable angina.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on September 6, 2019

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When should you get emergency care for heart failure?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.