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How are blood tests used to diagnose a heart attack?

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Blood may be drawn to measure levels of cardiac enzymes that indicate heart muscle damage. These enzymes are normally found inside the cells of your heart and are needed for their function. When your heart muscle cells are injured, their contents -- including the enzymes -- are released into your bloodstream. By measuring the levels of these enzymes, the doctor can determine the size of the heart attack and approximately when the heart attack started. Troponin levels will also be measured. Troponins are proteins found inside of heart cells that are released when they are damaged by the lack of blood supply to the heart. Detecting troponin in the blood may indicate a heart attack.

SOURCE: 

American Heart Association: ''Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke & Cardiac Arrest;''  ''Heart Attack Recovery FAQs;''  and "Symptoms and Diagnosis of Heart Attack.''

Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 8, 2020

SOURCE: 

American Heart Association: ''Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke & Cardiac Arrest;''  ''Heart Attack Recovery FAQs;''  and "Symptoms and Diagnosis of Heart Attack.''

Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 8, 2020

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What can I do if someone is having a heart attack?

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