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How can lifestyle choices help manage mitral valve regurgitation?

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This condition happens when a faulty valve in your heart lets some of your blood flow the wrong way. You can do lots of things to help ease your condition:

  • Exercise: It plays a big role in managing many types of heart disease. You’ll need to talk to your doctor about what kinds of physical activity are safest for you.
  • Stress: It can trigger a heart attack or chest pain in some people. Prescription medication, exercise, and relaxation therapy are a few ways to lower tension.
  • Smoking: It raises your chances for heart attacks and worsens regurgitation. If you smoke and have trouble quitting, ask your doctor for ways to break your habit.

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “When Leaky Valves Are at the Heart of the Problem.”

Columbia University Medical Center: “About the Heart.”

Mayo Clinic. “Mitral Valve Regurgitation (Symptoms, Causes).”

American Heart Association: “Heart Valve Problems and Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “How Is Heart Valve Disease Treated?”

American College of Cardiology: “Mitral Valve Regurgitation.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 02, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “When Leaky Valves Are at the Heart of the Problem.”

Columbia University Medical Center: “About the Heart.”

Mayo Clinic. “Mitral Valve Regurgitation (Symptoms, Causes).”

American Heart Association: “Heart Valve Problems and Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “How Is Heart Valve Disease Treated?”

American College of Cardiology: “Mitral Valve Regurgitation.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 02, 2018

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