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How can smaller servings of food help protect my heart?

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Overeating will make you gain weight, but that's not all. Studies show that more people have heart attacks after big meals.

Watch out for restaurant portion sizes. The CDC says the amount of food in an average restaurant meal today is like four restaurant meals from the 1950s. Studies show that the bigger the portion you're served, the more you'll eat.

The solution? Get in the habit of eating only half of what's on your plate. You can take the rest home.

From: How to Eat to Protect Your Heart WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Most Americans Don't Understand the Health Effects of Wine and Sea Salt, Survey Finds."

CDC: "Lifetime risk for diabetes mellitus in the United States."

Consumer Reports : "Heart Health."

N.A. Mark Estes III, MD, director, New England Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston.

Heart Healthy Women: "Diet," "Heart Healthy Diet -- Fiber and Grains."

Making Health Easier: "The New (Ab)Normal."

Gordon Tomaselli, MD, cardiology division chief, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on April 26, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Most Americans Don't Understand the Health Effects of Wine and Sea Salt, Survey Finds."

CDC: "Lifetime risk for diabetes mellitus in the United States."

Consumer Reports : "Heart Health."

N.A. Mark Estes III, MD, director, New England Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston.

Heart Healthy Women: "Diet," "Heart Healthy Diet -- Fiber and Grains."

Making Health Easier: "The New (Ab)Normal."

Gordon Tomaselli, MD, cardiology division chief, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on April 26, 2018

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