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How much salt should I eat to help protect my heart?

ANSWER

You probably need to cut back. Most people do. Aim for no more than a teaspoon a day. If you already have high blood pressure, you should eat even less.

Most Americans think sea salt is a low-sodium alternative to regular table salt. Wrong. It has the same amount of sodium. Any type of salt raises your blood pressure.

Salt doesn't just come from the shaker. Up to 75% of the salt you eat is from processed foods like soups and frozen meals. Always check the label to find out how much sodium is in it.

From: How to Eat to Protect Your Heart WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Most Americans Don't Understand the Health Effects of Wine and Sea Salt, Survey Finds."

CDC: "Lifetime risk for diabetes mellitus in the United States."

Consumer Reports : "Heart Health."

N.A. Mark Estes III, MD, director, New England Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston.

Heart Healthy Women: "Diet," "Heart Healthy Diet -- Fiber and Grains."

Making Health Easier: "The New (Ab)Normal."

Gordon Tomaselli, MD, cardiology division chief, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on April 26, 2018

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Most Americans Don't Understand the Health Effects of Wine and Sea Salt, Survey Finds."

CDC: "Lifetime risk for diabetes mellitus in the United States."

Consumer Reports : "Heart Health."

N.A. Mark Estes III, MD, director, New England Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston.

Heart Healthy Women: "Diet," "Heart Healthy Diet -- Fiber and Grains."

Making Health Easier: "The New (Ab)Normal."

Gordon Tomaselli, MD, cardiology division chief, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on April 26, 2018

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Why do I need to limit caffeine and alcohol to help protect my heart?

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