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What are some other treatments for heart palpitations?

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If lifestyle changes don’t help, you may be prescribed medications. In some cases, these will be beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers.

If your doctor finds a reason for your palpitations, he will focus on treating that reason. If they’re caused by a medication, he will try to find a different treatment.

If they represent an arrhythmia, you may get medications or procedures. You may also be referred to a heart rhythm specialist known as an electrophysiologist.

From: Heart Palpitations WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "Palpitations."

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: "What Are Palpitations?" "What Causes Palpitations?" "How Are Palpitations Treated?"

Pregnancyandchildcare.org: "Heart Palpitations During Pregnancy."

WomensHeart.org: "Cardiac Arrhythmia Management: Why Women are Different from Men."

Heart-palpitations.net: "Heart Pounding After Eating."

Mayo Clinic: “Chest X-Rays: Why it’s done.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 12, 2017

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "Palpitations."

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: "What Are Palpitations?" "What Causes Palpitations?" "How Are Palpitations Treated?"

Pregnancyandchildcare.org: "Heart Palpitations During Pregnancy."

WomensHeart.org: "Cardiac Arrhythmia Management: Why Women are Different from Men."

Heart-palpitations.net: "Heart Pounding After Eating."

Mayo Clinic: “Chest X-Rays: Why it’s done.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 12, 2017

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