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What can you do to lower LDL levels?

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Healthy foods and exercise can cut your LDL levels. Eat foods low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and simple carbs. (Simple carbs include foods like sugar, white bread, and white crackers.) You can lower your numbers even more if you add fiber and plant sterols (margarine or nuts) to your diet. Regular exercise, the kind that gets your heart pumping, also lowers your levels.

From: LDL: The 'Bad' Cholesterol WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "LDL and HDL Cholesterol: What's Bad and What's Good?"

Tabas, I.   2002. Journal of Clinical Investigation,

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need to Know."

Jenkins, D.K.   July 23, 2003. JAMA,

Stefanick, M.L.   1998. New England Journal of Medicine,

American Heart Association: "Good Cholesterol vs. Bad Cholesterol."

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: "Carbohydrates: Complex Carbs vs Simple Carbs."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 7, 2019

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "LDL and HDL Cholesterol: What's Bad and What's Good?"

Tabas, I.   2002. Journal of Clinical Investigation,

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need to Know."

Jenkins, D.K.   July 23, 2003. JAMA,

Stefanick, M.L.   1998. New England Journal of Medicine,

American Heart Association: "Good Cholesterol vs. Bad Cholesterol."

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: "Carbohydrates: Complex Carbs vs Simple Carbs."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 7, 2019

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How are medications used to help with LDL levels?

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