PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is the success rate of electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

ANSWER

Electrical cardioversion is more than 90% effective, though many have AFib again shortly after having it. Taking an antiarrhythmic drug before the procedure can prevent this. How well it works depends on the size of your left atrium as well as how long you’ve been in AFib. If you have a large left atrium or you’ve been in constant AFib for a year or two, it may not work as well. Taking antiarrhythmic drugs can also prevent AFib after a successful electrical cardioversion.

From: Cardioversion for AFib WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Saint Luke’s: “What is chemical cardioversion?”

American Heart Association: “Cardioversion,” “What is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?”

StopAfib.org: “Using Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Chemical cardioversion

Heart Rhythm Society: “Cardioversion.”

Cardiology.org: "Atrial Fibrillation."

Cleveland Clinic: "Cardioversion."

Hartford Hospital: "Cardioversion."

Heart Rhythm Society: "Cardioversion."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "Cardioversion," "What Are the Risks of Cardioversion?" "What to Expect Before Cardioversion."

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 03, 2018

SOURCES:

Saint Luke’s: “What is chemical cardioversion?”

American Heart Association: “Cardioversion,” “What is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?”

StopAfib.org: “Using Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Chemical cardioversion

Heart Rhythm Society: “Cardioversion.”

Cardiology.org: "Atrial Fibrillation."

Cleveland Clinic: "Cardioversion."

Hartford Hospital: "Cardioversion."

Heart Rhythm Society: "Cardioversion."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "Cardioversion," "What Are the Risks of Cardioversion?" "What to Expect Before Cardioversion."

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on May 03, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What is the success rate of chemical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (AFib)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.