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What should I expect during the MRA?

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You will lie on an exam table that slides into a large circular area, the magnetic field. The actual equipment may be different depending on where you get the test done. Some types allow little room to move. Newer designs have more room or open sides. The technologist will help you get into the correct position.

You will have to stay still during the test and may be asked to hold your breath at times. The technologist will take several images. The equipment makes very loud tapping or pounding noises, so you may wear ear plugs or headphones to help soften the sounds.

For some exams, you will get a special dye injected into one of your veins. It helps to make the images even clearer and more detailed.

From: What Is MRA? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Radiology: "ACR-NASCI-SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Body MRA."

American College of Radiology: "Manual on Contrast Media V10.2."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA).”

National Jewish Health: “MRA with or without Contrast."

Radiologyinfo.org: "MR Angiography (MRA)."

Society for Vascular Surgery: "Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Tests.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 1, 2018

SOURCES:

American College of Radiology: "ACR-NASCI-SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Body MRA."

American College of Radiology: "Manual on Contrast Media V10.2."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA).”

National Jewish Health: “MRA with or without Contrast."

Radiologyinfo.org: "MR Angiography (MRA)."

Society for Vascular Surgery: "Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Tests.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on August 1, 2018

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What happens after my MRA is finished?

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