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What medications are used to treat low blood pressure?

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If these measures don't lessen the problem, you may need medication. The following drugs are often used in treating low blood pressure:

  • Fludrocortisone is a medication that seems to help most types of low blood pressure. It works by promoting sodium retention by the kidney, thereby causing fluid retention and some swelling, which is necessary to improve blood pressure. But this sodium retention also causes a loss of potassium. So when taking fludrocortisone, it's important to get enough potassium each day. Fludrocortisone has none of the anti-inflammatory properties of cortisone or prednisone and does not build muscle like anabolic steroids.
  • Midodrine activates receptors on the smallest arteries and veins to produce an increase in blood pressure. It is used to help increase standing blood pressure in people with postural hypotension related to nervous system dysfunction.

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Low Blood Pressure."

Ferri, F. Mosby, 2012. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2012

FDA: "Midodrine Update: February 8, 2012."

Thaisetthawatkul P. 2004. Neurology

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on February 20, 2017

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Low Blood Pressure."

Ferri, F. Mosby, 2012. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2012

FDA: "Midodrine Update: February 8, 2012."

Thaisetthawatkul P. 2004. Neurology

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on February 20, 2017

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