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  • Question 1/9

    On average, a heart beats how many times in a minute?

  • Answer 1/9

    On average, a heart beats how many times in a minute?

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    Heart rates are different, depending on your age, fitness, and if you’re moving or at rest. But for most people, a normal resting heart rate is in this range.

  • Question 1/9

    If your heart rate is high, your blood pressure will be, too.

  • Answer 1/9

    If your heart rate is high, your blood pressure will be, too.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Blood pressure is the force your blood puts on your artery walls as it flows through your body. Heart rate is the number of times your heart beats in a minute. The two may rise and fall together sometimes, like when you sense danger. But it’s possible for one to go up and not the other.

  • Question 1/9

    You might need a pacemaker if your heart beats:

  • Answer 1/9

    You might need a pacemaker if your heart beats:

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    • Correct Answer:

    If your resting heart rate is lower than 60 beats per minute, that’s known as bradycardia. In serious cases, your heart may not be able to pump enough blood to the rest of your body. Certain medications and conditions, like thyroid issues or sleep apnea, can cause it. If that’s the case, your doctor will change your prescriptions or treat the cause. If not, a pacemaker (a small battery-operated device) can be put under your collarbone to keep your heartbeat at a normal rate.

  • Question 1/9

    What triggers your heartbeat?

  • Answer 1/9

    What triggers your heartbeat?

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    • Correct Answer:

    A tiny bundle of cells called the sinoatrial node sends out an electric signal from the top of your heart to the bottom. This kick-starts each beat and controls the rate and rhythm.

  • Answer 1/9

    What makes the “lub-dub” sound of a heart beat?

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    Heart valves are like doors: They open to let blood pass through to your heart, and they close to keep it from flowing the wrong way. The two sounds are the two valves -- the mitral and aortic -- closing as blood passes through your heart.

  • Question 1/9

    On average, how much blood does your heart pump in a minute?

  • Answer 1/9

    On average, how much blood does your heart pump in a minute?

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    • Correct Answer:

    That’s 2,000 gallons a day! It takes about 100,000 heartbeats to pump all that through your body: By the time you're 70, your heart will have beaten more than 2.5 billion times.

  • Question 1/9

    Your heart rate goes down when you sleep.

  • Answer 1/9

    Your heart rate goes down when you sleep.

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    • Correct Answer:

    When you snooze, your body doesn’t need to work as hard as it does when you’re awake. Heart rate, breathing, and blood pressure all take a dive below their normal numbers when you’re asleep.

  • Question 1/9

    Who’s most likely to have a slower heart rate?

  • Answer 1/9

    Who’s most likely to have a slower heart rate?

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    • Correct Answer:

    On average, women’s hearts beat 8 more times a minute than men’s do. Heart rate goes down with age, too. Kids’ hearts are smaller and pump less blood per beat, so their rates are faster.

  • Answer 1/9

    A heart murmur is:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Doctors sometimes describe the sound they make as a “whoosh” between heartbeats. They come and go, and usually don’t cause any problems. In fact, up to 90% of children have one at some point. But they also can be a sign of a heart valve problem that would need medical attention.

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Sources | Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar, MD on November 06, 2018 Medically Reviewed on November 06, 2018

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar, MD on
November 06, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Portokalis / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Heart Murmur.”

American Heart Association: “All About Heart Rate (Pulse),”  “Heart, How it Works.”
British Heart Foundation: “Hot weather and your heart.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Busting 5 Myths About Blood Pressure and Heart Rate,” “True or False? 6 Common Beliefs About Blood Pressure, Heart Rate,” “22 Amazing Facts About Your Heart.”

Kids Health: “Your Heart and Circulatory System.”

National Council on Strength and Fitness: “Heart Rate Guidelines for Adults and Children.”

March of Dimes: “How Your Baby Grows.”

Medscape: “Evaluation of a Newborn With a Murmur,” “Mortality Rises With High-Normal Heart Rate, but Exercise Limits Effect.”

Mayo Clinic: “Bradycardia.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What is a Pacemaker?”

UCLA Sleep Disorders Center: “Heart Disease.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.