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How is Barrett's esophagus treated?

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One of the primary goals of treatment is to prevent or slow the development of Barrett's esophagus by treating and controlling acid reflux. This is done with lifestyle changes and medication. Lifestyle changes include taking steps such as:

  • Make changes in your diet. Fatty foods, chocolate, caffeine, spicy foods, and peppermint can aggravate reflux.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeinated drinks, and tobacco.
  • Lose weight. Being overweight increases your risk for reflux.
  • Sleep with the head of the bed elevated. Sleeping with your head raised may help prevent the acid in your stomach from flowing up into the esophagus.
  • Don't lie down for three hours after eating.
  • Take all medicines with plenty of water.

SOURCES :

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Barrett's Esophagus."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Barrett's esophagus."

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: "GERD, Barrett's Esophogus, and the Risk for Esophageal Cancer."

Smith K., et al. August 2009; vol 7: pp 840-848. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology,

National Heartburn Alliance: "What You Should Know About Heartburn and Esophageal Cancer."

 Ferri: Practical Guide to the Care of the Medical Patient,  8th ed.

Feldman: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease,  9th ed.

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on September 11, 2017

SOURCES :

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Barrett's Esophagus."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Barrett's esophagus."

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: "GERD, Barrett's Esophogus, and the Risk for Esophageal Cancer."

Smith K., et al. August 2009; vol 7: pp 840-848. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology,

National Heartburn Alliance: "What You Should Know About Heartburn and Esophageal Cancer."

 Ferri: Practical Guide to the Care of the Medical Patient,  8th ed.

Feldman: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease,  9th ed.

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on September 11, 2017

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What medications are used to treat Barrett's esophagus?

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