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How is fundoplication used to treat acid reflux disease?

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Another surgical procedure called fundoplication can help prevent further acid reflux. It creates an artificial valve using the top of your stomach. The procedure involves wrapping the upper part of the stomach around the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to strengthen it, prevent acid reflux, and repair a hiatal hernia. Surgeons perform this procedure through either an open incision in the abdomen or chest or with a lighted tube inserted through a tiny incision in the abdomen.

These procedures are done only as a last resort for treating acid reflux disease after medical treatment has proven inadequate.

From: What Is Acid Reflux Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC): "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "GERD or Acid Reflux or Heartburn." 

The American College of Gastroenterology: "Heartburn or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Heartburn: Hints on Dealing With the Discomfort."

FDA: "LINX Reflux Management System."

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

SOURCES: 

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC): "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

Cleveland Clinic: "GERD or Acid Reflux or Heartburn." 

The American College of Gastroenterology: "Heartburn or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Heartburn: Hints on Dealing With the Discomfort."

FDA: "LINX Reflux Management System."

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

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