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What are the symptoms of heartburn related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)?

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Heartburn, also called acid indigestion, is the most common symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and usually feels like a burning chest pain beginning behind the breastbone and moving upward to the neck and throat. Many people say it feels like food is coming back into the mouth, leaving an acid or bitter taste.

The burning, pressure, or pain of heartburn can last as long as 2 hours and is often worse after eating. Lying down or bending over can also result in heartburn. Many people obtain relief by standing upright or by taking an antacid that clears acid out of the esophagus.

Heartburn pain is sometimes mistaken for the pain associated with heart disease or a heart attack, but there are differences. Exercise may aggravate pain resulting from heart disease, and rest may relieve the pain. Heartburn pain is less likely to be associated with physical activity -- but you can’t tell the difference, so seek immediate medical help if you have any chest pain.

From: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 10, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 9/10/2017

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)."

Pluta, R. , May 18, 2011. Journal of the American Medical Association

American College of Gastroenterology: "Understanding GERD." 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 10, 2017

SOURCES: 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)."

Pluta, R. , May 18, 2011. Journal of the American Medical Association

American College of Gastroenterology: "Understanding GERD." 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 10, 2017

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How common is heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)?

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