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What is an esophageal stricture?

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Over time, the damage caused by stomach acid can scar the lining of the esophagus. When this scar tissue builds up, it makes the esophagus narrow. Called strictures, these narrow spots make it hard to swallow food and drinks, which can lead to weight loss and dehydration. Doctors treat strictures with a procedure that gently stretches your esophagus.

From: Complications of Heartburn and GERD WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Gastroenterological Association: “Heartburn & GERD.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases: “Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults.”

Gaude, G. , July-September, 2009. Annals of Thoracic Medicine

Ranjitkar, S. , December 2012. International Journal of Dentistry

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Barrett’s esophagus.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Esophagitis.”

University of Minnesota Medical Center: “Esophageal ulcer.”

Oral Cancer Foundation: “Esophageal stricture.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases: “Barrett’s esophagus.”

The University of Chicago Medicine: “Barrett’s esophagus.”

American Cancer Society: “Esophagus cancer.”

Pace, F. , June 2008. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

Cleveland Clinic: “Gastroesophageal reflux.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 5, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

American Gastroenterological Association: “Heartburn & GERD.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases: “Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults.”

Gaude, G. , July-September, 2009. Annals of Thoracic Medicine

Ranjitkar, S. , December 2012. International Journal of Dentistry

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Barrett’s esophagus.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Esophagitis.”

University of Minnesota Medical Center: “Esophageal ulcer.”

Oral Cancer Foundation: “Esophageal stricture.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases: “Barrett’s esophagus.”

The University of Chicago Medicine: “Barrett’s esophagus.”

American Cancer Society: “Esophagus cancer.”

Pace, F. , June 2008. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

Cleveland Clinic: “Gastroesophageal reflux.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 5, 2018

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