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  • Question 1/10

    When was the first living donor liver transplant done?

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    When was the first living donor liver transplant done?

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    This surgery made its debut in 1989. It gave people waiting for livers from deceased donors a chance to get a transplant sooner. At first, adults became donors for children so they could get a healthy liver faster. Then, over time, adults who needed a new liver were able to get transplants this way, too.

  • Question 1/10

    To be a living donor, you should:

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    To be a living donor, you should:

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    You don't have to be a family member to be a donor. Some centers do require that you have a blood type that fits the person getting the transplant. You also need to be between 18 and 60. And if you're a smoker, you'll need to stop 6 weeks before the surgery.

  • Answer 1/10

    What can keep you from becoming a living donor?

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    You can't be a donor if you have a serious medical condition. Other things that might rule you out are mental illness and substance abuse. It's OK to have a close family member with liver disease, but your doctor will ask you to get more tests than usual to make sure it's safe.

  • Question 1/10

    Which test does a potential living donor need to get?

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    Which test does a potential living donor need to get?

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    If you want to be a living donor, your doctor will do a variety of tests to make sure you're healthy. These include blood and urine tests as well as an echocardiogram that checks your heart. If you're a woman, you'll need a Pap smear and in some cases, a mammogram. You might have to get a colonoscopy -- which checks for colon cancer -- if you're 50 or older.

  • Question 1/10

    How much of your liver do you donate?

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    How much of your liver do you donate?

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    If you're a donor for a child, you'll give them about 20% of your liver. If it goes to an adult, they may get up to 60%. While that sounds like a lot, the liver has the power to regrow. Over the next 2 months, your liver will return to its normal size.

  • Question 1/10

    If you become a living donor, how long does the surgery take?

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    If you become a living donor, how long does the surgery take?

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    You'll have your surgery at the same time as the person who needs a new liver. After surgeons remove part of your liver, they'll take it right away to a nearby operating room and transplant it into the recipient.

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    Which risk does a living donor face?

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    Which risk does a living donor face?

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    It's generally safe to be a living liver donor, but it's still major surgery. Some other possible complications are an allergic reaction to anesthesia, pain, nausea, infection of the wound, bleeding, scar tissue, and problems with your bile ducts -- tubes that carry fluid from your liver that helps with digestion.

  • Question 1/10

    How long does a donor stay in the hospital after surgery?

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    How long does a donor stay in the hospital after surgery?

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    Although everyone's different, most people need to stay in the hospital for a week or less after the transplant. In the month that follows, your doctor will keep an eye on your health during office visits. Most people return to work in 8 to 10 weeks.

  • Question 1/10

    Donors must follow a special diet after the transplant.

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    Donors must follow a special diet after the transplant.

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    There are no special foods you need to eat or avoid, but you should stick to a healthy diet and lifestyle. You will need checkups by your surgeon 1 and 2 years out from the transplant. You'll also need yearly exams with your regular doctor.

  • Question 1/10

    Who pays for a living donor liver transplant?

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    Who pays for a living donor liver transplant?

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    If you are receiving a transplant, your health insurance will pay the costs for you and the donor. That doesn't include things like time off work or travel. Your donor will need to work that out ahead of time.

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Sources | Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy, MPH, MD on March 19, 2019 Medically Reviewed on March 19, 2019

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy, MPH, MD on
March 19, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) wildpixel / Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

Mount Sinai: "Liver Donation Surgery and Recovery."

American Transplant Foundation: "Living Liver Donation Overview."

American Society of Transplantation: "Living Donor Liver Transplantation."

University of Michigan Health: "How Does Living Liver Donation Work? 6 Things to Know."

Lahey Hospital & Medical Center: "Donor Requirements & Evaluation - Live Liver Transplantation."

University of California, San Francisco: "Living Liver Donor Transplant."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "What to Expect as a Liver Donor."

Merck Manual: "Overview of Gallbladder and Bile Duct Disorders."

Columbia Surgery: "Living Donor Liver Transplantation FAQs."

University of Wisconsin Health: "Live Liver Donation Frequently Asked Questions."

UChicago Medicine: "First living-donor liver transplant recipient graduates from high school May 27."

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