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Are some medicines not OK to take if you have hepatitis C?

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Go over all the prescription and over-the-counter drugs you take with your doctor. Some may have side effects that can hurt your liver. For example, too much acetaminophen can cause liver damage. Other painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen are dangerous if you have scarring in your liver, called cirrhosis. Talk to your doctor to see what's best for you.

From: Healthy Habits With Hepatitis C WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC: "Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Hepatitis C."

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs : "Is it safe to take aspirin or Tylenol if I have Hepatitis C?" "Alcohol and Hepatitis: What you can do," "Can you pass Hepatitis C to a sex partner?"

UptoDate: "Patient information: Hepatitis C (Beyond the Basics)."

VA Hepatitis C Resource Centers: "Hepatitis C: An Introductory Guide for Patients."

World Health Organization: "Hepatitis C."

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on April 15, 2019

SOURCES:

CDC: "Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Hepatitis C."

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs : "Is it safe to take aspirin or Tylenol if I have Hepatitis C?" "Alcohol and Hepatitis: What you can do," "Can you pass Hepatitis C to a sex partner?"

UptoDate: "Patient information: Hepatitis C (Beyond the Basics)."

VA Hepatitis C Resource Centers: "Hepatitis C: An Introductory Guide for Patients."

World Health Organization: "Hepatitis C."

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on April 15, 2019

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Are supplements OK if you have hepatitis C?

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