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Are there any long-term effects of hepatitis C?

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About 75% to 85% of people who have hepatitis C develop a long-term infection called chronic hepatitis C. It can lead to conditions like liver cancer and cirrhosis, or scarring of the liver. This is one of the top reasons people get liver transplants.

From: Hepatitis C and the Hep C Virus WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

News release, FDA. The Cleveland Clinic Department of Gastroenterology. CDC.  "Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals." The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Hepatitis C Treatment Side Effects Management Chart." UptoDate: "Patient Information: "Hepatitis C (Beyond the Basics)." FDA. "FDA approves Mavyret for Hepatitis C." "Mavyret Prescribing Information." Hepatitis C Online. "Sofosbuvir-Velpatasvir-Voxilaprevir (Vosevi)." "Daclatasvir (Daklinza)."






Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on August 23, 2019

SOURCES:

News release, FDA. The Cleveland Clinic Department of Gastroenterology. CDC.  "Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals." The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Hepatitis C Treatment Side Effects Management Chart." UptoDate: "Patient Information: "Hepatitis C (Beyond the Basics)." FDA. "FDA approves Mavyret for Hepatitis C." "Mavyret Prescribing Information." Hepatitis C Online. "Sofosbuvir-Velpatasvir-Voxilaprevir (Vosevi)." "Daclatasvir (Daklinza)."






Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on August 23, 2019

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How is hepatitis C treated?

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