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Are there symptoms during the hepatitis C window period?

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Most people don’t know that they have hepatitis C during the early stages, including the “window,” or incubation, period. If you do have symptoms, one of the most common ones is jaundice. With jaundice, which is a sign of liver damage, you may notice that your skin or the whites of your eyes have a yellowish tinge. You may also notice other changes. Your urine may be darker. When you poop, the color may be closer to the color of clay. Other symptoms may include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, joint pain, stomach pain, and swollen feet or legs.

SOURCES:

CDC: “Guide to Comprehensive Hepatitis C Counseling and Testing,” Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals,” “Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Hepatitis C.”

UpToDate.com: “Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of acute hepatitis C virus infection in adults.”

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “Getting Tested for Hepatitis C.” 

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on June 27, 2020

SOURCES:

CDC: “Guide to Comprehensive Hepatitis C Counseling and Testing,” Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals,” “Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Hepatitis C.”

UpToDate.com: “Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of acute hepatitis C virus infection in adults.”

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “Getting Tested for Hepatitis C.” 

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on June 27, 2020

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What are tests that you may get during the hepatitis C incubation period?

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