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Do all hepatitis C medications work the same?

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There's no one-size-fits-all option. There are six different types or genotypes of hepatitis C, and there are more than 50 subtypes. Type 1 is the most common. This is important to understand when you talk to your doctor. Not all medications work on all types. Which medicine is best for you also depends on how much liver scarring (cirrhosis) you have.

From: Hepatitis C Treatments WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Ryan Ford, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine.

William D. Carey, MD, senior hepatologist, Department of Gastroenterology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

HCV Advocate: “A Brief History of Hepatitis C.”

CDC: "Hepatitis C FAQs for Consumers." "Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals."

Curry, M.P. , Dec. 31, 2015. New England Journal of Medicine

News Release, FDA.

FDA: "FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA warns of serious liver injury risk with hepatitis C treatments Viekira Pak and Technivie." "FDA approves Mavyret for Hepatitis C." "Epclusa Prescribing Information." "FDA approves Viekira Pak to treat hepatitis C."

Feld, J. , Nov. 23, 2015. NEJM

HCV Advocate. "What is Cirrhosis?"

HCV New Drug Research: “ZEPATIER - Recommended Dosage and Durations, Drug Interactions, Side Effects, Clinical Studies.”

Hepatits C Online. "Peginterferon alfa-2a (Pegasys)." "Sofosbuvir-Velpatasvir-Voxilaprevir (Vosevi)." "Daclatasvir (Daklinza)." "Elbasvir-Grazoprevir (Zepatier)." "Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir (Technivie)." "Sofosbuvir-Velpatasvir (Epclusa)."

Merck Connect. "Zepatier product site: Zepatier and You."

News Release, Gilead.

News Release, Merck.

Pharmacy Times: "Will Hepatitis C Virus Medication Costs Drop in the Years Ahead?"

Up-To-Date: “Direct-acting antivirals for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.”

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and Quasispecies."

University of Washington: "Sofosbuvir (Sovaldi)."

Zeuzem, S. , July 7, 2015.   Annals of Internal Medicine

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Ryan Ford, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine.

William D. Carey, MD, senior hepatologist, Department of Gastroenterology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

HCV Advocate: “A Brief History of Hepatitis C.”

CDC: "Hepatitis C FAQs for Consumers." "Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals."

Curry, M.P. , Dec. 31, 2015. New England Journal of Medicine

News Release, FDA.

FDA: "FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA warns of serious liver injury risk with hepatitis C treatments Viekira Pak and Technivie." "FDA approves Mavyret for Hepatitis C." "Epclusa Prescribing Information." "FDA approves Viekira Pak to treat hepatitis C."

Feld, J. , Nov. 23, 2015. NEJM

HCV Advocate. "What is Cirrhosis?"

HCV New Drug Research: “ZEPATIER - Recommended Dosage and Durations, Drug Interactions, Side Effects, Clinical Studies.”

Hepatits C Online. "Peginterferon alfa-2a (Pegasys)." "Sofosbuvir-Velpatasvir-Voxilaprevir (Vosevi)." "Daclatasvir (Daklinza)." "Elbasvir-Grazoprevir (Zepatier)." "Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir (Technivie)." "Sofosbuvir-Velpatasvir (Epclusa)."

Merck Connect. "Zepatier product site: Zepatier and You."

News Release, Gilead.

News Release, Merck.

Pharmacy Times: "Will Hepatitis C Virus Medication Costs Drop in the Years Ahead?"

Up-To-Date: “Direct-acting antivirals for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.”

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and Quasispecies."

University of Washington: "Sofosbuvir (Sovaldi)."

Zeuzem, S. , July 7, 2015.   Annals of Internal Medicine

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 14, 2018

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What type of medication will my doctor suggest for my hepatitis C?

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