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Does SVR mean you're cured of hepatitis C?

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If blood tests can’t find hepatitis C 12 weeks or more after you finish treatment, that means you've reached sustained virologic response (SVR). In 99% of cases you'll stay free of the virus for the rest of your life.

SVR means you can’t pass the virus on to other people. You still can’t give blood, though. Some doctors might test for hep C one more time, 6-12 months after you reach SVR. But you're most likely cured at this point.

Your doctor may continue to watch your liver damage and function, especially if your hepatitis was far along or if you have other serious health issues.

You can also reinfect yourself with hep C. And it can be harder to treat the second time around. Common ways you can get infected again include:

  • Shared needles for IV drug users
  • Sexual partners, especially for IV drug users
  • Shared razors or toothbrushes
  • Homemade tattoo equipment

SOURCES:

American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases: "Initial Treatment of Adults with HCV Infection," "HCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C."

CDC: "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals," "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public."

Infohep.org: "Hepatitis C treatment factsheet: Harvoni (sofosbuvir + ledipasvir)."

Hepatitis C Online: "Goals and Benefits with HCV Treatment," "Ledipasvir-Sofosbuvir (Harvoni)."

Merck Manual: "Overview of Chronic Hepatitis."

The Hepatitis Trust: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Genotypes of hepatitis C," "Harvoni."

Treatment Action Group: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Harvoni Fact Sheet."

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy: "Transferability of Economic

Evaluation Studies: Is There a Generally Accepted Alternative Price Benchmark to the WAC Price?"

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "FAQs about Sustained Virologic Response to

Treatment for Hepatitis C," "Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease," "Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Treatment Considerations."

Federal Bureau of Prisons: "Evaluation and management of chronic hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 29, 2020

SOURCES:

American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases: "Initial Treatment of Adults with HCV Infection," "HCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C."

CDC: "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals," "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public."

Infohep.org: "Hepatitis C treatment factsheet: Harvoni (sofosbuvir + ledipasvir)."

Hepatitis C Online: "Goals and Benefits with HCV Treatment," "Ledipasvir-Sofosbuvir (Harvoni)."

Merck Manual: "Overview of Chronic Hepatitis."

The Hepatitis Trust: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Genotypes of hepatitis C," "Harvoni."

Treatment Action Group: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Harvoni Fact Sheet."

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy: "Transferability of Economic

Evaluation Studies: Is There a Generally Accepted Alternative Price Benchmark to the WAC Price?"

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "FAQs about Sustained Virologic Response to

Treatment for Hepatitis C," "Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease," "Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Treatment Considerations."

Federal Bureau of Prisons: "Evaluation and management of chronic hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 29, 2020

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