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How are liver lesions diagnosed?

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If your doctor thinks you might have a liver lesion, he’ll probably recommend one or more of these:

Blood tests. He might use these to test for viral hepatitis or to see how well your liver is working. He also may want to check your level of a certain protein (alpha-fetoprotein, or AFP). High amounts of that can be a sign of liver cancer.

Imaging tests. These can show where a lesion is on your liver and how big it is. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses powerful magnets and radio waves to make detailed images of your liver. A computed tomography (CT) scan is a series of X-rays put together to make a more complete picture. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan uses a special dye that makes your liver show up more clearly. And an ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make live images of your liver.

Biopsy. To rule out cancer, your doctor may want to take a small sample of the lesion to look for problem cells.

From: What Are Liver Lesions? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Liver Association: “Benign Liver Tumors.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Malignant Hepatic Lesions.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Metastatic Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment,” “Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Liver Cancer Prevention & Risk Factors.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 27, 2017

SOURCES:

American Liver Association: “Benign Liver Tumors.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Malignant Hepatic Lesions.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Metastatic Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment,” “Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Liver Cancer Prevention & Risk Factors.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 27, 2017

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How are liver lesions treated?

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