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How can taking care of your liver help manage hepatitis C?

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Hepatitis C can make it harder for your liver to do its main job: break down and filter out substances from your bloodstream. As a result, medications, herbs, drugs, and alcohol may stay in your system longer, and have a more powerful effect. Some substances pose the risk of serious liver damage. Common painkillers and cold remedies with aspirin and acetaminophen can be toxic to people with damaged livers, especially if you take them with alcohol or in greater than recommended doses. Be careful with herbal remedies, too. They can be powerful medicine, and some of them can do real harm. Don't assume that over-the-counter medications are safe, either. Never take any drugs, supplements or alternative medicines before talking to your doctor. If you're a smoker, try to quit. If you’re using illegal drugs, get into a treatment program. Ask your doctor whether you should cut out alcohol completely, or limit drinks to special occasions.

SOURCES: Paul Berk, MD, professor of medicine and emeritus chief of the division of liver disease, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City; former chairman of the board, American Liver Foundation. Alan Franciscus, executive director, Hepatitis C Support Project and editor-in-chief of HCV Advocate, San Francisco. Thelma King Thiel, chair and CEO, Hepatitis Foundation International. David Thomas, MD, professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore. Howard J. Worman, MD, associate professor of medicine and anatomy and cell biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City. The American Gastroenterological Association. National Sleep Foundation: “Healthy sleep tips.” CDC. The Hepatitis Foundation International. The HCV Advocate. The National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases. WebMD Medical Reference: " "











Health Guide A-Z: Hepatitis C,"Newly Diagnosed: Hepatitis C.

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on April 15, 2019

SOURCES: Paul Berk, MD, professor of medicine and emeritus chief of the division of liver disease, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City; former chairman of the board, American Liver Foundation. Alan Franciscus, executive director, Hepatitis C Support Project and editor-in-chief of HCV Advocate, San Francisco. Thelma King Thiel, chair and CEO, Hepatitis Foundation International. David Thomas, MD, professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore. Howard J. Worman, MD, associate professor of medicine and anatomy and cell biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City. The American Gastroenterological Association. National Sleep Foundation: “Healthy sleep tips.” CDC. The Hepatitis Foundation International. The HCV Advocate. The National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases. WebMD Medical Reference: " "











Health Guide A-Z: Hepatitis C,"Newly Diagnosed: Hepatitis C.

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on April 15, 2019

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