PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can untreated hepatitis C lead to blood and vessel problems?

ANSWER

Hepatitis C mainly hurts your liver, and can even lead to liver failure. But it often causes other problems, including blood and vessel problems. People with hepatitis C often get a condition called cryoglobulinemia. This happens when certain proteins in your blood stick together in cold weather. They can build up in vessels and block blood flow, which causes swelling and damage. The condition can affect your skin, organs, nerves, and joints.

SOURCES:

American Liver Foundation Hep C 123: “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Gastroenterology : “Extrahepatic morbidity and mortality of chronic hepatitis C.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Hepatitis C.”

Therapeutic Advances in Infectious Disease : “Extrahepatic Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.”

The Hepatitis C Support Project: “An Overview of Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C.”

BioDrugs : “Management of hepatitis C virus-related arthritis.”

Frontiers in Endocrinology : “Diabetes and Hepatitis C: A Two-Way Association.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Atherosclerosis,” “Preventing Hepatitis B or C.”

World Journal of Gastroenterology : “Neuropsychological alterations in hepatitis C infection: The role of inflammation.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hepatitis C.”’

American Cancer Society: “Liver Cancer Risk Factors.”

Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports : “A case of hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis: accelerated bone turnover controlled by pulse steroid therapy.”

American College of Rheumatology: “HCV and Rheumatic Disease.”

The Rheumatologist : “Hepatitis C Virus Infection Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Johns Hopkins: “Liver Disease Statistics.”

World Health Organization: “Hepatitis C.”

The Hepatitis C Trust: “Cirrhosis.”

Skeletal Radiology : “An uncommon cause of acquired osteosclerosis in adults: hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis.”

National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project: “CIRRHOSIS: advanced liver disease.”

CDC: “Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public.”

Hepatitis C Association: “Acute Hepatitis C Infection and Spontaneous Viral Clearance in Adults and Children.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on December 11, 2018

SOURCES:

American Liver Foundation Hep C 123: “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Gastroenterology : “Extrahepatic morbidity and mortality of chronic hepatitis C.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Hepatitis C.”

Therapeutic Advances in Infectious Disease : “Extrahepatic Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.”

The Hepatitis C Support Project: “An Overview of Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C.”

BioDrugs : “Management of hepatitis C virus-related arthritis.”

Frontiers in Endocrinology : “Diabetes and Hepatitis C: A Two-Way Association.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Atherosclerosis,” “Preventing Hepatitis B or C.”

World Journal of Gastroenterology : “Neuropsychological alterations in hepatitis C infection: The role of inflammation.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hepatitis C.”’

American Cancer Society: “Liver Cancer Risk Factors.”

Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism Case Reports : “A case of hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis: accelerated bone turnover controlled by pulse steroid therapy.”

American College of Rheumatology: “HCV and Rheumatic Disease.”

The Rheumatologist : “Hepatitis C Virus Infection Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Johns Hopkins: “Liver Disease Statistics.”

World Health Organization: “Hepatitis C.”

The Hepatitis C Trust: “Cirrhosis.”

Skeletal Radiology : “An uncommon cause of acquired osteosclerosis in adults: hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis.”

National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project: “CIRRHOSIS: advanced liver disease.”

CDC: “Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public.”

Hepatitis C Association: “Acute Hepatitis C Infection and Spontaneous Viral Clearance in Adults and Children.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on December 11, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How can untreated hepatitis C affect your blood?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.