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How do you treat hepatitis C?

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Medications known as direct acting antivirals, or DAAs, stop the hepatitis C virus from making copies of itself. Some of the newer DAAs appear to work well on all types of hepatitis C. (Each type of hep C is known as a genotype because of its different genetic makeup.)

When you're diagnosed with hep C, your doctor will probably prescribe some combination of DAA drugs for 8-12 weeks. They could include:

Some medications combine two of these drugs into one pill.

These medicines may not be right for everyone because of cost, your other health issues, or other reasons. Before choosing a treatment, your doctor will check whether you are pregnant or have:

Still, DAAs work for hepatitis C in more than 90% of cases. Sometimes, your doctor has to add other drugs or adjust your dose or the length of your treatment.

  • Elbasvir
  • Glecaprevir
  • Grazoprevir
  • Ledipasvir
  • Pibrentasvir
  • Sofosbuvir
  • Velpatasvir
  • Voxilaprevir
  • Hepatitis B (or have had it before)
  • Kidney disease
  • Previous treatment for hep C
  • Cirrhosis
  • HIV
  • Liver cancer or are at high risk for it
  • A liver transplant

SOURCES:

American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases: "Initial Treatment of Adults with HCV Infection," "HCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C."

CDC: "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals," "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public."

Infohep.org: "Hepatitis C treatment factsheet: Harvoni (sofosbuvir + ledipasvir)."

Hepatitis C Online: "Goals and Benefits with HCV Treatment," "Ledipasvir-Sofosbuvir (Harvoni)."

Merck Manual: "Overview of Chronic Hepatitis."

The Hepatitis Trust: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Genotypes of hepatitis C," "Harvoni."

Treatment Action Group: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Harvoni Fact Sheet."

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy: "Transferability of Economic

Evaluation Studies: Is There a Generally Accepted Alternative Price Benchmark to the WAC Price?"

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "FAQs about Sustained Virologic Response to

Treatment for Hepatitis C," "Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease," "Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Treatment Considerations."

Federal Bureau of Prisons: "Evaluation and management of chronic hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 29, 2020

SOURCES:

American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases: "Initial Treatment of Adults with HCV Infection," "HCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C."

CDC: "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for Health Professionals," "Hepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public."

Infohep.org: "Hepatitis C treatment factsheet: Harvoni (sofosbuvir + ledipasvir)."

Hepatitis C Online: "Goals and Benefits with HCV Treatment," "Ledipasvir-Sofosbuvir (Harvoni)."

Merck Manual: "Overview of Chronic Hepatitis."

The Hepatitis Trust: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Genotypes of hepatitis C," "Harvoni."

Treatment Action Group: "Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Diagnostics Fact Sheet," "Harvoni Fact Sheet."

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy: "Transferability of Economic

Evaluation Studies: Is There a Generally Accepted Alternative Price Benchmark to the WAC Price?"

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "FAQs about Sustained Virologic Response to

Treatment for Hepatitis C," "Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease," "Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Treatment Considerations."

Federal Bureau of Prisons: "Evaluation and management of chronic hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on May 29, 2020

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