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How is fatty liver disease diagnosed?

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You might find out that you have the disease when you get a routine checkup. Your doctor might notice that your liver is a little larger than usual. Other ways your doctor might spot the disease are:

  • Blood tests. A high number of certain enzymes could mean you've got fatty liver.
  • Ultrasound. It uses soundwaves to get a picture of your liver. The doctor may also ask for an MRI or cat-scan to get additional images of your liver.
  • Biopsy. After numbing the area, your doctor puts a needle through your skin and takes out a tiny piece of liver, then looks at it under a microscope for signs of fat, inflammation, and damaged liver cells.

From: Fatty Liver Disease (Hepatic Steatosis) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Liver Foundation: "Fatty Liver Disease," "Fatty Liver."

EMedicine: "Alcoholic Fatty Liver."

NIDDK: "Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Fatty Liver Disease."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 4, 2019

SOURCES:

Liver Foundation: "Fatty Liver Disease," "Fatty Liver."

EMedicine: "Alcoholic Fatty Liver."

NIDDK: "Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Fatty Liver Disease."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 4, 2019

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What is the treatment for fatty liver disease?

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