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How is hepatitis C (HCV) commonly transmitted?

ANSWER

HCV is spread through contact with an infected person’s blood. That can be through genital sores or cuts, or menstrual blood. The virus can spread through sexual contact or other contact with infected blood.

SOURCES:

Scott D. Holmberg, MD chief, epidemiology and surveillance branch, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Joseph Lim, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Yale School of Medicine and director, Yale Viral Hepatitis Program.

Melissa Palmer, MD, clinical professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine.

John W. Ward, MD, director, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC: “The ABCs of Hepatitis.” 

Avert.org: “Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, & Hepatitis C.” 

CDC: “Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men.” 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on June 19, 2020

SOURCES:

Scott D. Holmberg, MD chief, epidemiology and surveillance branch, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Joseph Lim, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Yale School of Medicine and director, Yale Viral Hepatitis Program.

Melissa Palmer, MD, clinical professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine.

John W. Ward, MD, director, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC: “The ABCs of Hepatitis.” 

Avert.org: “Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, & Hepatitis C.” 

CDC: “Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men.” 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on June 19, 2020

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