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How is the APRI score calculated?

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The APRI score is based on the amount of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and platelets in your body. AST is an enzyme your liver creates. Platelets are a type of blood cell that help heal wounds and stop heavy bleeding.

Your doctor can check your AST and platelet levels with a blood test.

AST. Normally, your blood has low levels of AST. But a damaged liver releases more of the enzyme, which causes levels to rise. High levels of AST in your blood usually mean cirrhosis.

Platelets. The ideal platelet range is 150,000 to 400,000 per microliter (mcL) of blood. Doctors consider platelet counts above 400,000 high. When this happens, your body is making too many platelets, which raises your risk of blood clots. A low count is anything below 150,000, but results less than 50,000 mean you have a greater risk of heavy bleeding. People who have cirrhosis often have low platelet counts.

The formula for the APRI score is [(AST/upper limit of the normal AST range) X 100]/Platelet Count.

It’s a little tricky, but if you break it down into steps, it’s easier to understand.

The answer is your APRI score.

  • Divide your AST count by the upper limit of the normal AST range. Most experts say that 40 is a good value to use here.
  • Multiply that answer by 100.
  • Divide that answer by your platelet count.

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Hepatitis C,” “Liver function tests,” “Cirrhosis,” “Liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis C: How common is it?”

Open Forum Infectious Diseases : “APRI Score as a Predictor of Significant Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis B.”

Annals of Gastroenterology : “Liver fibrosis staging with combination of APRI and FIB-4 scoring systems in chronic hepatitis C as an alternative to transient elastography.”

National Library of Medicine: “Aspartate Transaminase to Platelet Ratio Index in Hepatitis C Virus and Schistosomiasis Coinfection,” “AST Test.”

American Red Cross: “Platelets and Thrombocytopenia.”

University of Washington (Hepatitis C): “AST to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI) Calculator.”

Medscape: “Role of AST to Platelet Ratio Index in the Detection of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Recurrent Hepatitis C After Liver Transplantation.”

University of Michigan (Health Lab): “Alternatives to Liver Biopsy: When are other tests appropriate?”

University of California, San Francisco: “Platelet Count.”

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on June 26, 2020

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Hepatitis C,” “Liver function tests,” “Cirrhosis,” “Liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis C: How common is it?”

Open Forum Infectious Diseases : “APRI Score as a Predictor of Significant Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis B.”

Annals of Gastroenterology : “Liver fibrosis staging with combination of APRI and FIB-4 scoring systems in chronic hepatitis C as an alternative to transient elastography.”

National Library of Medicine: “Aspartate Transaminase to Platelet Ratio Index in Hepatitis C Virus and Schistosomiasis Coinfection,” “AST Test.”

American Red Cross: “Platelets and Thrombocytopenia.”

University of Washington (Hepatitis C): “AST to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI) Calculator.”

Medscape: “Role of AST to Platelet Ratio Index in the Detection of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Recurrent Hepatitis C After Liver Transplantation.”

University of Michigan (Health Lab): “Alternatives to Liver Biopsy: When are other tests appropriate?”

University of California, San Francisco: “Platelet Count.”

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on June 26, 2020

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