PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Is it OK to smoke before surgery for living-donor liver transplant?

ANSWER

Stop smoking. Quitting tobacco 1-2 months before surgery can help cut the chance of complications. Quitting smoking even right before surgery can increase the amount of oxygen in your body. After 24 hours without smoking, nicotine and carbon monoxide are already gradually broken down in the blood. Your lungs start to work better after about 2 smoke-free months.

SOURCES:

Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Columbia University Department of Surgery, Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation: "Living-Donor Liver Transplantation FAQs."

Mayo Clinic: "Liver Transplant: What You Can Expect."

University of Utah Healthcare: "Checklist for Surgery."

University of California, San Francisco: "Liver Donors FAQ: The Donation Surgery."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Liver Transplant: Nutrition."

University of Wisconsin Health: "Live Liver Donation Frequently Asked Questions," "Liver Transplant Alcohol Policy."

University of Minnesota Health: "Living Donor Liver Transplant."

American Transplant Foundation: "What to Consider Before Donating."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on August 17, 2018

SOURCES:

Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Columbia University Department of Surgery, Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation: "Living-Donor Liver Transplantation FAQs."

Mayo Clinic: "Liver Transplant: What You Can Expect."

University of Utah Healthcare: "Checklist for Surgery."

University of California, San Francisco: "Liver Donors FAQ: The Donation Surgery."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Liver Transplant: Nutrition."

University of Wisconsin Health: "Live Liver Donation Frequently Asked Questions," "Liver Transplant Alcohol Policy."

University of Minnesota Health: "Living Donor Liver Transplant."

American Transplant Foundation: "What to Consider Before Donating."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on August 17, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What will happen after the surgery for living-donor liver transplant?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.