PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are complications of alcoholic hepatitis?

ANSWER

Alcoholic hepatitis is a serious condition that can happen from drinking too much alcohol. It can permanently damage your liver.

If you have alcoholic hepatitis, you could get other serious conditions, including:

  • Fluid buildup in the abdomen
  • Confusion or brain fog
  • Bleeding in the esophagus or stomach

From: Alcoholic Hepatitis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Lucey, M. , 2009.   The New England Journal of Medicine

American Liver Foundation: “Alcohol-Related Liver Disease.”

National Institutes of Health: “Hepatitis.”

AASLD Practice Guidelines: “Alcoholic Liver Disease.”

CDC: “Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions.”

Babineaux, M. , published online May 2011. World Journal of Hepatology

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “Viral Hepatitis.”

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: "Drinking Levels Defined."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 15, 2017

SOURCES:

Lucey, M. , 2009.   The New England Journal of Medicine

American Liver Foundation: “Alcohol-Related Liver Disease.”

National Institutes of Health: “Hepatitis.”

AASLD Practice Guidelines: “Alcoholic Liver Disease.”

CDC: “Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions.”

Babineaux, M. , published online May 2011. World Journal of Hepatology

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: “Viral Hepatitis.”

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: "Drinking Levels Defined."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 15, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

When should I get medical attention for alcoholic hepatitis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.