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What are some sex acts that are more likely to transmit hepatitis?

ANSWER

Hepatitis can spread more easily through sexual acts that might cause cuts, abrasions, or other injury.

Anal sex may be riskier than vaginal sex. Both are riskier for hepatitis than oral sex. Oral-anal contact is also risky. Practice safe sex with a barrier, such as a condom, dental dam, female condom, and finger cots between you and another person’s body fluids and blood. Also, get vaccinated against hepatitis A and B. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C.

SOURCES:

Scott D. Holmberg, MD chief, epidemiology and surveillance branch, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Joseph Lim, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Yale School of Medicine and director, Yale Viral Hepatitis Program.

Melissa Palmer, MD, clinical professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine.

John W. Ward, MD, director, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC: “The ABCs of Hepatitis.” 

Avert.org: “Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, & Hepatitis C.” 

CDC: “Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men.” 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on July 22, 2018

SOURCES:

Scott D. Holmberg, MD chief, epidemiology and surveillance branch, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Joseph Lim, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Yale School of Medicine and director, Yale Viral Hepatitis Program.

Melissa Palmer, MD, clinical professor of medicine, New York University School of Medicine.

John W. Ward, MD, director, division of viral hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC: “The ABCs of Hepatitis.” 

Avert.org: “Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, & Hepatitis C.” 

CDC: “Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men.” 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on July 22, 2018

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Can you get hepatitis through kissing?

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