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What conditions may be less likely in coffee drinkers?

ANSWER

Researchers have found that coffee drinkers may be less likely to have:

  • Liver cancer
  • Cancer in the lining of the uterus, called the endometrium
  • Fibrosis, a disease that makes scar tissue form inside your liver. It’s a reaction to conditions like hepatitis or alcohol use disorder.
  • Cirrhosis, a late stage of fibrosis. As this disease gets worse, your liver has a harder time doing its job.
  • Non-alcohol-related fatty liver disease, which develops when the liver cells store too much fat. This also keeps your liver from working like it should.

From: Can Coffee Help Your Liver? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Antiviral Research : “Anti-hepatitis B virus activity of chlorogenic acid, quinic acid and caffeic acid in vivo and in vitro.”

British Liver Trust: “Coffee and the Liver,” “Coffee consumption and the liver—the potential health benefits.”

Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition : “Coffee and Health: A Review of Recent Human Research.”

Hepatology: “Coffee intake is associated with lower rates of liver disease progression in chronic hepatitis C,” “Inverse associations of total and decaffeinated coffee with liver enzyme levels in NHANES 1999-2010.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cirrhosis,” “Does coffee offer health benefits?” “Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.”

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease : “Mid-life coffee and tea drinking and the risk of late-life dementia: a population-based CAIDE study.”

News release, Elsevier: “Take a coffee or tea break to protect your liver.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 23, 2017

SOURCES:

Antiviral Research : “Anti-hepatitis B virus activity of chlorogenic acid, quinic acid and caffeic acid in vivo and in vitro.”

British Liver Trust: “Coffee and the Liver,” “Coffee consumption and the liver—the potential health benefits.”

Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition : “Coffee and Health: A Review of Recent Human Research.”

Hepatology: “Coffee intake is associated with lower rates of liver disease progression in chronic hepatitis C,” “Inverse associations of total and decaffeinated coffee with liver enzyme levels in NHANES 1999-2010.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cirrhosis,” “Does coffee offer health benefits?” “Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.”

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease : “Mid-life coffee and tea drinking and the risk of late-life dementia: a population-based CAIDE study.”

News release, Elsevier: “Take a coffee or tea break to protect your liver.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 23, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Should you drink coffee for liver health?

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