PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Which type of hepatitis C is most likely to lead to liver cancer?

ANSWER

People with a type of hepatitis C virus known as HCV genotype 1b are almost twice as likely to get it as those with other types. A test can tell you which kind of virus you have.

SOURCES: 

Barnes, E. , January 2015. Hepatology

CDC: "Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public," "Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals," "Know More Hepatitis: Why Baby Boomers Should Be Tested."

Chen, S. and Morgan, T. , April 1, 2006. International Journal of Medical Sciences

Jagpreet, C. , Aug. 5, 2014. Annals of Internal Medicine

Mondelli, M. , November 2007. Hepatology

News release, . Journal of the American Medical Association

Providence Health Services: "FAQ: The link between hepatitis C and liver cancer."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Viral Hepatitis: Frequently Asked Questions."

News release, FDA.

World Health Organization: "Hepatitis C Fact Sheet."

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

SOURCES: 

Barnes, E. , January 2015. Hepatology

CDC: "Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public," "Hepatitis C FAQs for Health Professionals," "Know More Hepatitis: Why Baby Boomers Should Be Tested."

Chen, S. and Morgan, T. , April 1, 2006. International Journal of Medical Sciences

Jagpreet, C. , Aug. 5, 2014. Annals of Internal Medicine

Mondelli, M. , November 2007. Hepatology

News release, . Journal of the American Medical Association

Providence Health Services: "FAQ: The link between hepatitis C and liver cancer."

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Viral Hepatitis: Frequently Asked Questions."

News release, FDA.

World Health Organization: "Hepatitis C Fact Sheet."

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Is there a test that checks to see if I have liver cancer?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.