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Who can be a donor for living-donor liver transplant?

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This is when you donate a part of your liver to someone who need a new organ. There are several types of living-donor transplants. In every case, you’ll give someone with a damaged liver a chance to grow a new one. Your liver will grow back, too.

This is when you give a part of your liver to someone whose organ has been damaged. Most living donors donate to someone they know, but sometimes to strangers. You can donate to a family member, including a parent, child, sibling, uncles, aunts, or cousins. Or the person can be your spouse, friend, mother in law, or a co-worker.

From: Types of Living-Donor Liver Transplants WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Allegheny Health Network: "Transplant Surgery Living Donor Facts."

Columbia University Medical Center: "Living Donor Liver Transplantation FAQs."

Jefferson Health: "Domino Liver Transplant."

Mayo Clinic: "Amyloidosis Definition," "Liver Transplant."

UC Davis Health System: "Matching and Compatibility."

UNOS Transplant Living: "Non-Related," "Paired Donation," "Related."

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: "Living Non-Directed Organ Donation.

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on August 17, 2018

SOURCES:

Allegheny Health Network: "Transplant Surgery Living Donor Facts."

Columbia University Medical Center: "Living Donor Liver Transplantation FAQs."

Jefferson Health: "Domino Liver Transplant."

Mayo Clinic: "Amyloidosis Definition," "Liver Transplant."

UC Davis Health System: "Matching and Compatibility."

UNOS Transplant Living: "Non-Related," "Paired Donation," "Related."

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: "Living Non-Directed Organ Donation.

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on August 17, 2018

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What is nondirected liver transplants?

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