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Who gets liver lesions?

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Anyone can have a liver lesion, but some things can make you more likely to have cancerous ones:

Hepatitis B or C. These viruses are the main cause of liver cancer.

Cirrhosis. You may get this condition if you have hepatitis B or C or if you’re a heavy drinker. It happens when scar tissue grows in place of damaged liver cells, and it can lead to cancer. About 80% of people diagnosed with themost common type of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, have cirrhosis.

Iron storage disease (hemochromatosis).This is one of the most common genetic disorders in the U.S. It makes your body take in too much iron from food. The extra iron gets stored in your organs, including your liver.

Obesity, as well as arsenic, a chemical that occurs naturally but can be poisonous. It’s sometimes found in drinking water.

Aflatoxin: This toxin is created when mold grows on grain and nuts that aren’t stored the right way. It’s very rare in the U.S.

From: What Are Liver Lesions? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Liver Association: “Benign Liver Tumors.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Malignant Hepatic Lesions.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Metastatic Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment,” “Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Liver Cancer Prevention & Risk Factors.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 27, 2017

SOURCES:

American Liver Association: “Benign Liver Tumors.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Malignant Hepatic Lesions.”

California Pacific Medical Center: “Metastatic Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment,” “Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions Diagnosis and Treatment.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Liver Cancer Prevention & Risk Factors.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 27, 2017

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What are the symptoms of liver lesions?

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