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Who should I tell about my hepatitis C?

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You should tell your family, your spouse, your sexual partners, and anyone else who might have caught the disease from you. The chances are small that any of these people have hepatitis C, but it's important that they know so that they can be tested and treated if necessary.

Telling others you have hepatitis C isn't only for their benefit. It's for your benefit too. You need the support of family and possibly some close friends to help you better cope with your illness.

From: Coping With Hepatitis C WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Paul Berk, MD, professor of medicine and emeritus chief of the division of liver disease, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City; former chairman of the board, American Liver Foundation. Alan Franciscus, executive director, Hepatitis C Support Project and editor-in-chief of HCV Advocate, San Francisco. Thelma King Thiel, chair and CEO, Hepatitis Foundation International. David Thomas, MD, professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore. Howard J. Worman, MD, associate professor of medicine and anatomy and cell biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City. The American Gastroenterological Association. CDC. The Hepatitis Foundation International. The HCV Advocate. The National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases. WebMD Medical Reference: " ," "Newly Diagnosed: Hepatitis C."










Health Guide A-Z: Hepatitis C

Reviewed by David Zelman on November 03, 2018

SOURCES: Paul Berk, MD, professor of medicine and emeritus chief of the division of liver disease, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City; former chairman of the board, American Liver Foundation. Alan Franciscus, executive director, Hepatitis C Support Project and editor-in-chief of HCV Advocate, San Francisco. Thelma King Thiel, chair and CEO, Hepatitis Foundation International. David Thomas, MD, professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore. Howard J. Worman, MD, associate professor of medicine and anatomy and cell biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City. The American Gastroenterological Association. CDC. The Hepatitis Foundation International. The HCV Advocate. The National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases. WebMD Medical Reference: " ," "Newly Diagnosed: Hepatitis C."










Health Guide A-Z: Hepatitis C

Reviewed by David Zelman on November 03, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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