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  • Question 1/10

    Hepatitis can hurt which organ?

  • Answer 1/10

    Hepatitis can hurt which organ?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The word “hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver. It makes the organ swell and keeps it from doing its many jobs -- helping to digest food, store energy, and clear toxins from your blood.  Some forms of hepatitis are mild, but others can cause serious problems, like long-term liver disease, scarring (called cirrhosis), or even cancer. 

  • Question 1/10

    What causes hepatitis A, B, and C?

  • Answer 1/10

    What causes hepatitis A, B, and C?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Hepatitis A, B, and C are infections caused by different viruses. There are other forms of viral hepatitis, called D and E, but they aren’t common in the U.S. Too much fat in the liver, drug or alcohol abuse, and other things can cause hepatitis, too.

  • Question 1/10

    Which is the most common kind of viral hepatitis in the U.S.?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which is the most common kind of viral hepatitis in the U.S.?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Hepatitis C is more common than A and B combined.  The CDC estimates that 30,500 new hepatitis C infections happened in 2014, while 19,200 people got hepatitis B and 2,500 got hepatitis A that year.

  • Question 1/10

    Your doctor might suggest hepatitis testing even if you feel good.

  • Answer 1/10

    Your doctor might suggest hepatitis testing even if you feel good.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Some people have no idea they’ve been infected because they might never feel sick.  But if blood tests at your annual checkup show that your liver might be damaged, you’ll need more tests. Some signs of infection to watch for: flu-like symptoms, stomach pain, vomiting, and yellow-looking skin and eyes (called jaundice).

  • Question 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis goes away on its own?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis goes away on its own?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you get hepatitis A, you’ll probably get better in a few weeks and your liver will be fine. Some people with hepatitis B (especially young kids) and most folks with hepatitis C get a long-term infection that doesn’t go away on its own. These people are more likely to get liver damage or cancer than those whose immune systems can get rid of the virus. 

  • Question 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis has a vaccine to prevent it?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis has a vaccine to prevent it?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s a vaccine for hepatitis A and B, but not for C.  The CDC says all newborns should start the hepatitis B vaccine before they leave the hospital. Kids should begin the hepatitis A series of shots at age 1. Adults can be vaccinated, too. Ask your doctor if she thinks you should get one.

  • Question 1/10

    Bad bathroom habits can spread which kind of hepatitis?

  • Answer 1/10

    Bad bathroom habits can spread which kind of hepatitis?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Hepatitis A spreads through poop. An infected person who doesn’t wash up after using the toilet and then makes food or touches a plate or utensil can give it to you. You can also get it through sex. Sometimes, food that’s grown, harvested, or processed in unclean conditions can cause an outbreak.

  • Question 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis spreads mainly through sex?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis spreads mainly through sex?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Hepatitis B is in body fluids and blood, so it’s easy to pass it on during sex. The hep B vaccine offers the best protection, but you can also avoid it by using condoms or dental dams.  Hepatitis C spreads through infected blood. Today, most people get it by injecting drugs and sharing needles. It’s unlikely, but you can get hepatitis C through sex.

  • Question 1/10

    Which generation of Americans should get tested for hepatitis C?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which generation of Americans should get tested for hepatitis C?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you were born between 1945 and 1965, you should get tested.  About 75% of people with hepatitis C infections are in this age group. If you’ve ever injected drugs (even once) or got a blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1992, it’s smart to get tested.

  • Question 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis can be cured?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which kind of hepatitis can be cured?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    New therapies may give you a 90% chance of being cured and prevent further liver damage. If there’s no trace of the virus in your blood 3 to 6 months after treatment is over, doctors consider you cured. You’re not immune to the virus though --  you can get infected again if you’re not careful. There’s no cure for hepatitis B, but treatment can help control the virus.

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Sources | Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar, MD on October 21, 2018 Medically Reviewed on October 21, 2018

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar, MD on
October 21, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health: “Hepatitis,” “Hepatitis A.”

CDC: “Hepatitis D,” “Hepatitis E,” “Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public,” “Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public,” “Hepatitis C: Why People Born Between 1945-1965 Should Get Tested.”

American Liver Foundation: “Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease,” “Hepatitis A.”

The Mayo Clinic: “Elevated Liver Enzymes.”

Planned Parenthood: “How to Prevent Hepatitis B.”

Up-to-Date: “Patient education: Hepatitis C (Beyond the Basics).”

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