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  • Question 1/8

    You can get HIV from:

  • Answer 1/8

    You can get HIV from:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    HIV can only get into your body through semen, vaginal fluids, anal fluids, breast milk, and blood. Mosquitoes don’t inject blood into you when they bite you. It’s rare to get HIV from oral sex, but it can happen. Your odds go up if you have open sores, bleeding gums, or come into contact with menstrual blood. The highest risk comes from mouth-on-penis oral sex.

  • Question 1/8

    It’s OK not to use a condom if both you and your partner are HIV-positive.

  • Answer 1/8

    It’s OK not to use a condom if both you and your partner are HIV-positive.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s just smart to practice safer sex to protect yourself from all sexually transmitted diseases. Also, there’s more than one type of strain of HIV. Even if both you and your partner have it, you can be infected with another type that may be harder to treat.

  • Question 1/8

    If you’re HIV-positive, you should start treatment …

  • Answer 1/8

    If you’re HIV-positive, you should start treatment …

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Today’s HIV drugs and regular medical care can help you live a long and healthy life. It could take years for HIV symptoms to show up. Starting your treatment right away after a positive test increases your life span and lowers the chance you’ll pass it on to a partner. 

  • Question 1/8

    You’re most likely to get HIV from unprotected:

  • Answer 1/8

    You’re most likely to get HIV from unprotected:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Anal sex without a condom is the riskiest, especially if you’re on the bottom. Tears in your anus make it easy for semen to carry the virus into your body.

  • Question 1/8

    Using a condom correctly lowers your HIV risk by:

  • Answer 1/8

    Using a condom correctly lowers your HIV risk by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The only way to get to 100% protection against HIV is not to have sex. But you can lower the odds by 80% if you use a condom correctly when you do have oral, vaginal, or anal sex. Make it a practice to always protect yourself, even if you think your partner doesn’t have HIV.

  • Question 1/8

    Everyone with HIV gets AIDS:

  • Answer 1/8

    Everyone with HIV gets AIDS:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    AIDS is the most advanced stage of HIV. Although HIV doesn’t have a cure, you can keep it under control with early and regular treatment, and it may never progress to the AIDS stage.

  • Question 1/8

    You’re at risk of HIV if you share:

  • Answer 1/8

    You’re at risk of HIV if you share:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Using the same needle as someone else is the second most common way to spread HIV. (Unprotected sex is the first.) You can’t get HIV from a toilet seat or from casual contact like a hug or handshake.

  • Question 1/8

    If you treat your HIV early in pregnancy, you lower your baby’s HIV risk to:

  • Answer 1/8

    If you treat your HIV early in pregnancy, you lower your baby’s HIV risk to:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you know you’re HIV-positive and you get pregnant, antiretroviral therapy (ART) can cut your chances of passing it on to your baby to almost zero. Without treatment, the risk of giving it to your unborn child goes up to 25%.

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Sources | Reviewed by Neha Pathak, MD on January 15, 2020 Medically Reviewed on January 15, 2020

Reviewed by Neha Pathak, MD on
January 15, 2020

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SOURCES:

Office on Women’s Health: “Facts about HIV and AIDS,” “HIV and AIDS Basics,” “HIV Prevention.”

CDC: “Oral Sex and HIV Risk.”

HIV.gov: “Who is at Risk for HIV?” “What are HIV and AIDS?”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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