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How is Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) diagnosed?

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Kaposi's sarcoma is a type of cancer. It’s most often caused by HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Your doctor may diagnose Kaposi's sarcoma simply by looking at your skin. To confirm it, they may take a sample of tissue from a spot and look at it under a microscope, called a biopsy.

If you have trouble breathing, your doctor may use a thin tube with a light (a bronchoscope) to look into your breathing passages. Or, if you have tummy troubles, they may want to look inside your guts through a lighted tube during a procedure called an endoscopy.

From: What Is Kaposi's Sarcoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: "Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ)–Patient Version."

American Cancer Society: "Kaposi Sarcoma."

AIDS Treatment Data Network: "KS (Kaposi's Sarcoma)."

New Mexico AIDS Education & Training Center: "Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS)."

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on December 16, 2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: "Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ)–Patient Version."

American Cancer Society: "Kaposi Sarcoma."

AIDS Treatment Data Network: "KS (Kaposi's Sarcoma)."

New Mexico AIDS Education & Training Center: "Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS)."

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on December 16, 2018

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How is Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) treated?

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