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What are some of the challenges faced by older people when it comes to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)?

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The number of older people with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is growing. In part, that's because better treatments are helping people who have the disease live longer.

But thousands of older people are also newly diagnosed with HIV every year. And there could be more seniors who have the disease without realizing it.

The idea that HIV has a bad reputation and feelings of shame or fear may keep older people from learning about the disease, getting tested, and seeking treatment.

From: How Is HIV Different for Older People? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 15, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 09/15/2018

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "HIV, AIDS, and Older People."

AIDS.gov: "Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults."

Medical News Today: "Inflammation: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment."

CDC: "Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Depression."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Older Adults and Depression."

American Psychological Association: "Multimorbidity and depression in HIV-infected older adults."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 15, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "HIV, AIDS, and Older People."

AIDS.gov: "Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults."

Medical News Today: "Inflammation: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment."

CDC: "Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Depression."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Older Adults and Depression."

American Psychological Association: "Multimorbidity and depression in HIV-infected older adults."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 15, 2018

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What things can make it challenging for older people to protect themselves from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)?

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