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What are standard tests for HIV?

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Standard tests are blood tests that check for HIV antibodies. Your body makes antibodies in response to the HIV infection. These tests can't detect HIV in the blood soon after infection because it takes time for your body to make these antibodies. It generally takes two to 8 weeks for your body to produce antibodies, but in some cases it can take up to six months.

In standard tests, a small sample of your blood is drawn and sent to a lab for testing. Some of the standard tests use urine or fluids that are collected from the mouth to screen for antibodies.

From: Pregnancy and HIV Testing WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on December 5, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 12/5/2017

SOURCES:

The March of Dimes .

The Mayo Clinic

CDC: National HIV and STD Testing Resources.

FDA Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on December 5, 2017

SOURCES:

The March of Dimes .

The Mayo Clinic

CDC: National HIV and STD Testing Resources.

FDA Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on December 5, 2017

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What are antibody/antigen tests for HIV?

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