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What are the signs and symptoms of HIV in the first few weeks?

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Between one and four weeks after someone is infected with the virus, they may have flu-like symptoms that last a week or two. It happens because the body is reacting to HIV, and the immune system tries to fight it off. The symptoms at this stage can include:

Keep in mind that even if you have these symptoms, that doesn’t automatically mean you are HIV-positive. Many different illnesses can cause these problems. Talk to a doctor or an HIV testing facility if you think you might be infected.

At this early stage of HIV infection, it’s important to know that you may not get accurate results from an HIV test. It can take 3-12 weeks for enough signs of the virus to show up on routine tests for the infection, which measure antibodies against HIV. A new kind of screening, called a nucleic acid test, can detect the virus itself during this early stage, but it’s expensive and not usually used for routine HIV testing.

Let the testing site or your doctor know if you think you might be recently infected. Also, be sure to use a condom every time you have sex, and take other steps to prevent spreading the virus.

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Upset stomach
  • Sore throat
  • Swollen glands
  • Rash
  • Aches and pains in muscles and joints

From: Do I Have HIV? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

AIDS.gov: “Symptoms of HIV,” “Who is at Risk for HIV?”

AVERT: “Symptoms and Stages of HIV Infection.”

CDC: “HIV/AIDS: Testing.”

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on June 23, 2019

SOURCES:

AIDS.gov: “Symptoms of HIV,” “Who is at Risk for HIV?”

AVERT: “Symptoms and Stages of HIV Infection.”

CDC: “HIV/AIDS: Testing.”

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on June 23, 2019

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What are the signs and symptoms of HIV months to years after infection?

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