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What is the cause of HIV and AIDS in children?

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Most children who have HIV got it from their mother when she was pregnant, during the birth process, or from breastfeeding. Women who are tested, and then stick with treatment if they're positive, greatly lower the chance of passing the virus to their babies. This is the best way to prevent HIV in children.

Kids in communities affected by AIDS who have lost parents and family members are also more vulnerable to HIV infection. They may lack caregivers, access to school, or the ability to stand up for their rights.

Children can be infected through sexual abuse or rape.

Injected drug use spreads HIV among young people living on the streets.

Transfusions of HIV-positive blood or injections with unsterilized needles could infect children in poorer countries. The U.S. and Western European countries have medical safeguards to prevent this problem.

From: Children With HIV and AIDS WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

AVERT: "Children and HIV/AIDS."

World Health Organization.

CDC: "HIV Among Pregnant Women, Infants, and Children."

University of Cincinnati: "HIV in Infants and Children."

Boston Children's Hospital: "AIDS/HIV."

Mother and Child Nutrition: "Coping with complications of HIV/AIDS at a glance."

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on December 02, 2016

SOURCES: 

AVERT: "Children and HIV/AIDS."

World Health Organization.

CDC: "HIV Among Pregnant Women, Infants, and Children."

University of Cincinnati: "HIV in Infants and Children."

Boston Children's Hospital: "AIDS/HIV."

Mother and Child Nutrition: "Coping with complications of HIV/AIDS at a glance."

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on December 02, 2016

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What are the symptoms of HIV in children?

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