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What is the difference between HIV and AIDS?

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HIV is a virus. It may lead to AIDS, the disease you can get after the virus has infected your body for several years and has weakened your immune system.

Not everyone who has HIV will get AIDS, but without treatment with antiretroviral drugs the infection will progress to AIDS. That usually happens in 10-15 years, according to the World Health Organization.

SOURCES:

Office on Women’s Health: “How is AIDS different from HIV?” and “Opportunistic Infections and Other Conditions.”

CDC: “HIV/AIDS: Statistics Overview;” “Act Against AIDS: Basic Statistics;” and “HIV in the United States: At a Glance.”

Medline Plus Medical Dictionary: “Immunodeficiency.”

AIDS.gov: “HIV Lifecycle.”

New York University Institute of Human Development and Social Change Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies: “HIV/AIDS Info.”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “HIV/AIDS.”

Department of Health & Human Services AIDSinfo: “HIV Overview” and “HIV Treatment.”

The Foundation for AIDS Research: “Thirty Years of HIV/AIDS: Snapshots of an Epidemic.”

World Health Organization: "HIV/AIDS."

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on February 20, 2018

SOURCES:

Office on Women’s Health: “How is AIDS different from HIV?” and “Opportunistic Infections and Other Conditions.”

CDC: “HIV/AIDS: Statistics Overview;” “Act Against AIDS: Basic Statistics;” and “HIV in the United States: At a Glance.”

Medline Plus Medical Dictionary: “Immunodeficiency.”

AIDS.gov: “HIV Lifecycle.”

New York University Institute of Human Development and Social Change Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies: “HIV/AIDS Info.”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “HIV/AIDS.”

Department of Health & Human Services AIDSinfo: “HIV Overview” and “HIV Treatment.”

The Foundation for AIDS Research: “Thirty Years of HIV/AIDS: Snapshots of an Epidemic.”

World Health Organization: "HIV/AIDS."

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on February 20, 2018

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What are the most common ways that HIV spreads?

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