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Who is at risk for HIV?

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You get HIV through direct contact with certain kinds of body fluids -- blood, semen, pre-seminal fluid (also called pre-cum), vaginal fluids, rectal fluids, and breast milk. The biggest risks are having vaginal or anal sex without a condom or sharing needles with someone who has HIV. But other things can increase your odds of having it, too. The CDC recommends that everyone in the United States between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as a precaution. In addition, you should ask yourself the following questions, and if you answer yes to any of them, you should get tested:

  • Have you had unprotected sex with someone who has HIV or a person whose HIV status you don’t know?
  • Have you injected drugs (including hormones, steroids, and silicone) and shared needles or syringes with others?
  • Have you been diagnosed with an STD?
  • Have you been diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) or hepatitis?
  • Have you had sex with anyone who would answer “yes” to any of the questions above?
  • Have you been sexually assaulted?

From: Do I Have HIV? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

AIDS.gov: “Symptoms of HIV,” “Who is at Risk for HIV?”

AVERT: “Symptoms and Stages of HIV Infection.”

CDC: “HIV/AIDS: Testing.”

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on June 23, 2019

SOURCES:

AIDS.gov: “Symptoms of HIV,” “Who is at Risk for HIV?”

AVERT: “Symptoms and Stages of HIV Infection.”

CDC: “HIV/AIDS: Testing.”

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on June 23, 2019

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What are the signs and symptoms of HIV in the first few weeks?

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