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Why should you talk to your kids about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)?

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Teens and young adults get almost one-fourth of new HIV infections in the U.S.

Children can get HIV when they have sex with, are sexually abused by, or share needles or syringes with someone who has HIV.

Teens may be injecting steroids or hormones, as well as street drugs like heroin. They may reuse needles for body art, including piercing and tattooing.

SOURCES:

CDC: "Sexual Risk Behaviors: HIV, STD, & Teen Pregnancy Prevention," "HIV/AIDS Among Youth."

The Media Project: "Parent-Child Communication: Helping Teens Make Healthy Decisions about Sex."

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Office of Adolescent Health: "Talking with Teens: Sexually Transmitted Diseases."

TeensHealth: "HIV Testing Resources."

UCSF Center for AIDS Prevention Studies: "How Do Parents and Children Talk About HIV?"

Red Cross: "Children, Parents, and HIV."

Mothers' Voices: "Current Facts about HIV/AIDS."

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on October 26, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC: "Sexual Risk Behaviors: HIV, STD, & Teen Pregnancy Prevention," "HIV/AIDS Among Youth."

The Media Project: "Parent-Child Communication: Helping Teens Make Healthy Decisions about Sex."

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Office of Adolescent Health: "Talking with Teens: Sexually Transmitted Diseases."

TeensHealth: "HIV Testing Resources."

UCSF Center for AIDS Prevention Studies: "How Do Parents and Children Talk About HIV?"

Red Cross: "Children, Parents, and HIV."

Mothers' Voices: "Current Facts about HIV/AIDS."

Reviewed by Jonathan E. Kaplan on October 26, 2018

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How should you talk to your kids about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)?

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