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How is renal artery stenosis treated?

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Initial treatment for renal artery stenosis is often medication. The condition may require three or more different drugs to control high blood pressure. Patients may also be asked to take other medications, such as cholesterol-lowering drugs and aspirin.

In a few limited cases, an intervention such as angioplasty, often with stenting or surgery, may be recommended.

Some people may need surgery to bypass the narrowed or blocked portion of the artery and/or remove a non-functioning kidney. However, this procedure is not often done. 

From: Renal Artery Stenosis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: JAMA Patient Page: "Renal Artery Stenosis." Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Renal Artery Stenosis Treatments: A Guide for Consumers." Weinberg, M. , March 2010. Simon, J. , March 2010.



Cleveland Clinic Journal of MedicineCleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on January 17, 2017

SOURCES: JAMA Patient Page: "Renal Artery Stenosis." Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Renal Artery Stenosis Treatments: A Guide for Consumers." Weinberg, M. , March 2010. Simon, J. , March 2010.



Cleveland Clinic Journal of MedicineCleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on January 17, 2017

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