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How often should I get my blood pressure checked?

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Here are some basic guidelines:

  • If your blood pressure is normal (less than 120/80), get it checked at least every 2 years or more frequently as your doctor suggests.
  • If your blood pressure is borderline high (called prehypertension) -- systolic blood pressure between 120 and 139 or diastolic blood pressure of 80 to 89 -- check it at least every year or more often as your doctor suggests. Depending on whether you have other medical issues, a “borderline” reading might be considered too high.
  • If your reading is 140/90 or higher, you have high blood pressure and need to see your doctor. You may need to start medication.

From: Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: : Patient Page: "Hypertension." American Heart Association: "Understanding Blood Pressure Readings," "What is High Blood Pressure?" AHA HeartHub for Patients: "High Blood Pressure."  "The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure." American College of Cardiology: "2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults."




JAMAJAMA:

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on November 17, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES: : Patient Page: "Hypertension." American Heart Association: "Understanding Blood Pressure Readings," "What is High Blood Pressure?" AHA HeartHub for Patients: "High Blood Pressure."  "The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure." American College of Cardiology: "2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults."




JAMAJAMA:

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on November 17, 2017

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.