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How will a doctor test for malignant hypertension?

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A diagnosis of malignant hypertension is based on blood pressure readings and signs of acute organ damage.

If you have symptoms of malignant hypertension, your doctor will:

Additional blood tests may be needed, depending on the results of these tests.

  • Recheck your blood pressure and listen to your heart and lungs for abnormal sounds
  • Examine your eyes to check for damage to the blood vessels of the retina and swelling of the optic nerve
  • Order blood and urine tests that may include:
  • Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels, which increase if you have kidney damage
  • Blood clotting tests
  • Blood sugar (glucose) level
  • Complete blood count
  • Sodium and potassium levels
  • Urinalysis to check for blood, protein, or abnormal hormone levels related to kidney problems

From: Malignant Hypertension WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Understanding Blood Pressure Readings" and "Hypertensive Crisis."

Merck Manual Home Edition: "Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders: High Blood Pressure."

The Mount Sinai Medical Center: "Malignant Hypertension."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 8, 2017

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Understanding Blood Pressure Readings" and "Hypertensive Crisis."

Merck Manual Home Edition: "Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders: High Blood Pressure."

The Mount Sinai Medical Center: "Malignant Hypertension."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 8, 2017

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What imaging tests will a doctor use to check for malignant hypertension?

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