PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are the side effects of diuretics (water pills) for high blood pressure?

ANSWER

The water that comes out of your body has to go somewhere, so you can expect to be peeing more and more often for several hours after a dose.

You also run the risk of getting dehydrated, and simply drinking more fluids may not be enough. Call your doctor if you're very thirsty or have a very dry mouth, your pee is a deep yellow, you aren't peeing much or get constipated, or you have a bad headache.

You may feel dizzy or lightheaded, especially when you stand up, if your blood pressure has dropped too low, or you're getting dehydrated.

Your blood chemistry can get thrown off. You could have too little or too much sodium or potassium in your system. This can make you tired or weak or give you muscle cramps or a headache. It's rare, but your heart may speed up (over 100 beats a minute) or you might start throwing up because of a dangerously low potassium level.

Diuretics may make it harder for you to control your blood sugar, which can lead to diabetes if you don't already have it. You might be more likely to get gout.

Taking combination pills or multiple medicines could boost these side effects. To help lower those odds, ask your doctor when during the day you should take each medication.

American Heart Association: "Types of Blood Pressure Medications."

Blood Pressure UK: "Diuretics - blood pressure medication."

Mayo Clinic: "High blood pressure (hypertension): Diuretics."

European Heart Journal : "Adverse reactions to diuretics."

Consumer Reports : "What to Know About Diuretics for High Blood Pressure."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 02, 2017

American Heart Association: "Types of Blood Pressure Medications."

Blood Pressure UK: "Diuretics - blood pressure medication."

Mayo Clinic: "High blood pressure (hypertension): Diuretics."

European Heart Journal : "Adverse reactions to diuretics."

Consumer Reports : "What to Know About Diuretics for High Blood Pressure."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on May 02, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Who shouldn't take diuretics (water pills) for high blood pressure?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.